Make your own scrapbook embellishments tutorial (PSP)

April 27, 2011 at 20:57 (Tutorials)

If, like me, you’re not good at drawing, but still want to make your own embellishments, there are plenty of dingbat and doodle fonts that you can use to spice up your scrapbooking. Two of my favourite sites with lovely free dingbats are Miss Tina’s fonts and Kevin & Amanda’s Fonts for Peas, both of which are free for personal use (but be sure to read their TOU before using any fonts just to be on the safe side!).

Install the font you want to use before opening your PSP programme. Open a new image, I like using 400 x 400, but use any size you are comfortable with. Click on your text tool, scroll down to the doodle/dingbat font you want to use and type out the letter/dingbat you want use. I chose a heart and circles motifs from Pea Bethany’s Doodles font (capital F). You can use any colour because you can change it later. Use a font size you are comfortable with. For this one, I used 40 points, foreground black, background turned off. Objects – Align – Center in Canvas, then convert to raster.

Now activate your Oil Brush tool, which you can find here, along with various other Art Media tools (we will be using the Palette Knife later on!). I will also show you the toolbar that appears with the settings I used, but be sure to experiment with the settings. If you check the Auto clean box, the brush will be automatically cleaned every time you choose a new colour, if you leave it unchecked, you have to do that by clicking on the Clean icon next to it.

Activate your Oil Brush tool, choose the colour you would like to use, set the size, and start painting. You will notice that an Art Media layer appears above your dingbat layer. Simply drag it underneath so you can see the outlines of your drawing, make sure you are on the Art Media layer and continue painting.

I first painted the heart. To get rid of the excess paint around your design, go to your picture layer, and click inside the shape with the Magic Wand. Selections – Modify – Expand, and expand  by 1 pixel, then Selections – Invert, go to you Art Media layer, and hit delete. Now you can either leave it as it is and go to you next element, or you can make it more realistic by adding some shading. Make sure you are on you Art Media layer, activate the Palette knife tool, and choose a complementary shade to your colour, then start shading. You will need to experiment with this, if you don’t like what you did, simply go to Edit – Undo, and start over again until you come up with something you like. I sometimes use as many as 3 or 4 colours. When you are finished, get rid of the excess paint in the same way as before. Convert your Art Media Layer to Raster.This is important, so that you don’t mess up what you have already done when you begin painting the next part.

This is a good moment to decide the colour of your picture’s outline, so that any colours you use later will harmonise with it. To change the colour, first make sure you are on the outline layer, then Adjust – Manual Colour Correction and change it to whatever colour you want. I usually use a darker hue of the painted colour. (If this command is missing from your Adjust menu, use this tutorial to add it to the list of commands and have a look at this tutorial on how to use the Manual Colour Correction option.)

Now you can paint the other areas to your liking.

When you are finished, simply merge visible, and you are done!

Have fun!

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Make your own patterned filmstrip tutorial (PSP)

April 7, 2010 at 23:43 (Tutorials)

Open a new canvas, 400 x 400 pixels (or larger, if you want a larger frame) and with your Preset tool set to rectangle, draw out a rectangle the size your want (foreground closed, background set to black or colour or pattern of choice). Objects – Align – Centre in Canvas. Convert to Raster. Change your background colour to white, and with your Preset tool set to rounded rectangle, draw out a rectangle inside the black one. Objects – Align – Center in Canvas. Convert to Raster.

Click inside the white square with your Magic Wand (Tolerance set to 0), then Selections – Modify – Expand, and expand by 2 pixels. Go to the layer with the black square and hit delete. You can also delete the layer with the white square. Select none. This will be your basic film frame.

Now comes the fun part! Add a new layer and choose another preset shape or ding of choice. Set your background colour to any colour that shows up well against black (foreground colour closed off) and add to your frame. Simple shapes work best, but you can also experiment with other shapes.  Duplicate your shape as many times as necessary and arrange to your liking. Close off your black frame frame layer and merge the other layers (Layers – Merge – Visible). Open your black frame layer again.

Duplicate your pattern layer, then Image – Flip and move into position.  Close off the black frame layer, then Layers – Merge visible. Open your black frame layer.

Go to your pattern layer. Selections – Select all – Float – Defloat. Go to your black frame layer and hit delete, then delete your pattern layern. You can now duplicate your frame as many times as you need.

Have fun!

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Make your own playing cards tutorial (PSP)

January 7, 2010 at 05:02 (Tutorials)

Open a new raster layer, 500 x 500 pixels or the size you want and with your Preset Shape Tool set at rounded rectangle draw out a card shape the size you want (foreground off, background colour set to white). Objects – Align – Center in Canvas. Convert to raster. Click the card with your magic wand to select and fill with a colour, texture or pattern of your choice.

Draw a heart, either using a preset shape or a dingbat font, size depending on your card, using a colour of your liking. I used a dingbat font, with the colour set to red. Place your heart in the left upper corner and add a slight drop shadow. Layers – Duplicate, then Image – Mirror and Image – Flip so you have the heart in the lower right corner. Close off you card layer, and merge the two heart layers, then open the card layer again. You can find a card symbol font at http://www.pagat.com/com/cardsttf.html if you want to use a symbol other than a heart.

Choose a font of your liking, colour of choice and add some text if you wish. Convert to Raster, then Image – Free Rotate, direction Left by 90 degrees (All layers and Rotate single layer around canvas unchecked). Add a slight drop shadow. Layers – Duplicate, then Image – Mirror and Image – Flip.Close off your other layers, and merge the two text layers.

Add an image or photo of choice, or any other embellishments of your choice, meerge visible, and you’re finished! You can also add a slight bevel to  your card.

Have fun!

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Wax seal tutorial (PSP)

February 13, 2009 at 00:02 (Tutorials)

Open a picture of a wax texture (do a Google search or a search on Deviant Art) and using your Selection Tool set to circle, draw out a circle roughly the size you want your seal to be.Edit – Copy, then Edit – Paste as new image. Then enlarge your canvas size (Image – Canvas size, and set the values you need) so you have room around the circle. Duplicate this layer and close the bottom one. Making sure you top layer is the active one, go to Effects – Distortion effects – Wave and play around with the settings until you come up with something you like (I used: Amplitude: 2, Wavelength: 21 for the horizontal displacement,  and Amplitude: 3, Wavelength: 25 for the vertical displacement, Edge mode set to transparent).

wax-seal-1a

wax-seal-2

Make you bottom layer active. Selections – Select All – Float – Defloat, then Selections – Modify – Contract, and depending on the size, contract by 20-30 pixels. Make the top layer active and hit delete. Select none.

wax-seal-3

Add an inner bevel, either using PSP’s inner bevel or the Eye Candy Bevel filter. Click inside the bevel with you magic wand, Selections – Modify – Expand and expand by 6-8 pixels, depending on your bevel width. Selections – Invert, then go to your bottom layer and hit delete.

wax-seal-4

I like to add a cutout, because it gives more depth. If you want to do so, go to your bevel layer, click inside the bevel with your magic wand, Selections – Modify – Expand, and expand by 2-3 pixels, add a new raster layer and apply the cutout, using a dark complementary colour for the shadow instead of black (I used  Vertical: 6, Horizontal: 6, Opacity 80, Blur: 11, and then repeated it on a new layer with offset set at -6). Move the two cutout layers below the bevel layer.

wax-seal-5

Now comes the fun part! Choose the letter or ding shape you want inside. Simple forms work best.  Make your bottom layer active, and with the Text Tool add the letter or ding you want inside the seal using a colour complementing your wax colour. Convert to raster and use the Move Tool to place it into position. Add a slight inner bevel. Selections – Select all – Float – Defloat, then Selections – Modify – Expand, and expand by 3-4 pixels. Add a cutout on separate layers, like before, and move the cutout layers under the text layer. Merge all, and you’re done.

wax-seal-6

Have fun!

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Round frame with ribbon tutorial (PSP)

October 7, 2008 at 15:44 (Tutorials)

Open a new canvas and with your Preset tool set at circle, draw a circle the size and width you want your frame to be. Convert to raster. Add any textures or effects you want. Then Selections – Modify – Contract, and contract to the size you want your ribbon to be. Add a new raster layer and fill with the colour you want your ribbon to be. Select none.

With foreground colour set to white, background colour closed, use your Preset tool set at circle to draw out a small eyelet (size and width depending on your frame), convert to raster, then apply a metal or other effect. I used a Super Blade Pro preset. Duplicate your eyelet as many times as necessary, and, keeping them on separate layes, move them into the position you want them to be.

On your ribbon layer, erase the greater portion of the ribbon which will go under the frame, then move your ribbon layer so that it is over the eyelets.

Go to the first ribbon section. Move the eyelets into their exact position, then click inside the first eyelet with your Magic wand, then Selections – Modify – Expand by 1 pixel, go to the frame layer and hit delete. Select none. Repeat for the other eyelet. Go to your ribbon layer, lower its opacity a bit so you can see the eyelet underneath, and using the Mesh warp tool, draw in the two ends of the ribbon towards the eyelets. When you’re happy with the result, you can put the opacity back again.

Go to the layer of your first eyelet, and with your Selection tool set at rectangle, select the portion of the eyelet over the ribbon. Edit – Copy, then add a new raster layer, drag it above your ribbon layer, then Edit – Paste into selection. Select none. Repeat for the other eyelet, then go back to your ribbon layer and carefully erase the ribbon bits extending beyond the eyelet.

Repeat this for the other ribbon sections. When you’re finished, close off your ribbon layer, your frame layer, and your eyelet section layer above the ribbon layer, and Merge visible. Staying on your eyelet layer, hold the Shift key down, and with your Magic wand click inside each eyelet, then Effects – 3D effects – Cutout and apply a cutout, using a dark colour complementing your ribbon colour. Select none. Now go to your ribbon layer and apply any effects you wish to make it more realistic. I used the Eye Candy Textuyre/Texture noise filter. Add a slight drop shadow to the ribbon layer. You can also use the Darken tool on the frame layer to slightly darken the areas beside the ribbon.

You’re basically done! You can now either merge visible or add some embellishments, like a bow, a charm, a tag, etc.

Have fun!

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Flower tutorial (PSP)

October 5, 2008 at 06:57 (Tutorials)

Open a flower tube, either one you made yourself, or one which is OK to use for your own projects, then apply the Mapped Thingies filter in Filter Factory Gallery F. I like to reduce the default setting on the Stripes to around 10, depending on the image.

Make a copy of the flower and recolour it to your liking. Then Select – Select all – Float – Defloat, then Select – Modify – Select selection borders and modify by 3-5 pixels on both sides, depending on the size of your flower and the size of the border you want. Add a new raster layer, and then fill with a gradient, a complementary colour, a pattern, or fill with white and apply a Super Blade Pro Preset. Select none.

Add a new layer between the flower and the edge pattern, With your Freehand selection tool draw around the petals (I like the Smart edge option), then fill with the same pattern or apply the same effect as on the edges.

You can also play with the flower layer, adding some texture or other effect.

Have fun!

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Ribbon with eyelets tutorial (PSP)

September 29, 2008 at 21:23 (Tutorials)


Open a new canvas, size depending on how large you want your ribbon to be and place the eyelets you want to use into position, then place your ribbon into position over the eyelets. Keep the eyelets on separate layers because you might need to move them around a bit. I made my own eyelet using a dingbat font and a ribbon by drawing out a rectangle the length of the eyelets and then applying the Eye Candy Texture/Texture noise filter. I used grey so I can later recolour it.

Using the Mesh Warp tool. draw in the ribbon at the section over the eyelet hole and draw it out a bit between two eyelets.

I recoloured my ribbon at this point. This is what you should have now.

Move the first eyelet into the exact position you want it to be , then lower the opacity of the ribbon layer so you can see the eyelet underneath and then carefully erase the ribbon section which will go under the eyelet. Move the second eyelet into position. Select the section of the eyelet going over the ribbon with your selection tool, Edit – Copy, then go to your ribbon layer, add a new raster layer and Edit – Paste into selection. Go back to the ribbon layer and use the Mesh warp tool again to adjust the ribbon sections in the eyelet hole if necessary. Repeat for the other eyelets.

Merge visible, and you’re done!

Have fun!

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Notebook tutorial (PSP)

August 27, 2008 at 01:41 (Tutorials)

Open a new canvas (make it large, so you have plenty of space) and draw a rectangle the size you want your notebook paper to be with your Preset rectangle tool (foreground colour closed, background colour of choice). Convert to raster and apply any effects you wish (a paper texture, lines, etc.) I used a paper texture from Filters Unlimited, Mura’s Cloud filter and the Jeux des Lignes/Entrelacement filter. Duplicate, and move it beside the other rectangle, leaving a small space between them.

Add a new raster layer and with your Preset tool set at circle, draw a circle between the two papers the size you want your binder to be (foreground white, background closed, line width depending on the size of your papers). Convert to raster, and then carefully erase the lower two-thirds. Apply a metal effect. Add a new raster layer and move it under the binder layer. Add a small circle of medium to dark grey colour under the two ends of the binder with yout Paintbrush tool (size slightly larger than the size of your binder). Close the two paper layers, merge visible, then you can open your paper layers again.

Add a new raster layer, then Layers – Arrange – Send to bottom. With your selection tool set at Rectangle draw out a rectangle the size of your two papers starting from the corner of one paper. Selections – Modify – Select selection borders (use the both sides option) and expand by the number of pixels you want your cover to be, then on the bottom layer fill with colour of choice. Select none, then with your selection tool draw around the part between the two papers and fill with the same colour. Apply any effects you wish to the cover layer (I used PSP’s fine leather texture and a slight paper texture from Filters Unlimited). You can also add a slight bevel.

Duplicate your binder as many times as you wish and move into position.

You now have a basic notebook. You can now add decorative corners to the cover, duplicate one of the pages and curl it, add some text. etc.

Have fun!

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Stitched frame tutorial (PSP)

August 5, 2008 at 17:16 (Tutorials)

Open a new raster layer and with your Preset tool set at rectangle, draw a rectangle the size you want your frame to be (foreground colour or pattern of choice, background closed, line width depending on the size of your frame). Add any effects you want to and a very slight bevel. When you’re happy with your frame, Layers – Duplicate and keeping the frames on separate layers, move them beside each other keeping a small gap between them.

Add a new raster layer. Draw a line across the two frames roughly the size you want your stitch to be (round ended line style, colour white, width depending on the size of the frame and the size of your stitch). Convert to raster. Select all – Float – Defloat, then use the Eye Candy 5: Texture / Texture Noise filter to add some texture. I used the Crumpled tissue setting. Or you can use the Paper Textures/ Fine Canvas filter of Filters Unlimited for some texture depth or the Texturizer filter. Select none. Adjust – Manual colour correction and colourize to a colour complementing your frame.

Now Image – Free rotate – Right and set the Free option at 45 (uncheck the All layers options and Rotate single layer option). Layers – Duplicate, then Image – Mirror. Now move your stitches in the position you want them to be relative to the frame. Close your two frame layers and merge visible, then you can turn on the frame layers again.

Add a new raster layer and drag it below your stitch layer. Choose a medium greyish colour and a round brush tip to draw four dots under your stitches with the Paintbrush tool (size depending on the size of your stitch). Close the two frame layers and merge visible, then turn on the frame layers again. You can add a slight drop shadow to the stitch, if necessary.

Duplicate your stitches as many times as you wish and move them into the position you want them to be. You can now either merge visible or use the Pick tool to give some perspective to your frame, and then merge visible.

l

Have fun!

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Button tutorial (PSP)

August 3, 2008 at 23:22 (Tutorials)

Open a new image 300 by 300 pixels and with draw a circle with your preset tool (background and foreground colour of choice). Objects – Align center in canvas. Convert to raster.

Choose another preset shape or ding of choice and draw out your shape (use a contrasting colour), making it smaller than your button. Objects – Align center in canvas, or use the move tool to position it. Convert to raster. Click on an empty area with your magic wand (tolerance set to 0), then Selections – Invert. Go to your button layer and hit delete. Select none. You can now either delete or close your shape layer.

Add a bevel, either using PSP’s bevel effect or the Eye Candy Bevel filter.

Click inside the cut-out with you magic wand, then Selections – Modify – Expand by 3 pixels, add a new raster layer, drag it under the button layer and fill with a complementary colour or pattern. Select none. On the button layer, click inside the cut-out again, expand by 1 pixel, add a new raster layer, then Effects – 3D effects – Cutout. I used Vertical: 4, Horizontal: 4, Opacity: 84, Blur: 20 and a dark comnplementary shadow colour, but you’ll need to adjust your settings depending on your shape and colour. Seelct none. Layers merge visible.

Draw the holes on a separate layer. Selections -Select all – Float – Defloat, hit delete, then go to your button layer and hit delete again. Keep selected, add a new layer, and add a slight cut-out. Select none, merge visible, and you’re done. You can now add stitches to the button or decorate it using another ding.

Have fun!

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